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This website is dedicated to Ol'Conrad.  He passed away shortly after Christmas, 2013.  He had made stupendous contributions to our hobby through his dedicated and careful breeding of aquatic animals.  He was a good friend and best buddy of Pete's and will not only be missed greatly by Pete, the hobby will forever have lost a valuable friend and asset. But his progeny will live on forever in his memory.
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Hypostomus plecostomus is often referred to as the Common Pleco, and is very widely available. Unfortunately, many beginning aquarists do not realize how big this fish will grow, nor do they realize that as the fish ages, it may become more agressive, especially to other plecos.

I personally think it is irresponsible for LFS to even sell the common pleco because, if it lives, they will outgrow the common hobbyist tank.


"Plecostomus are often considered funny looking by those new to these and most people enjoy having them in their tanks. There are many species of Plecostomus, and almost all species tend to stay out of the light and many species of Plecostomus are nocturnal, which means they hide in a dark place when the lights are on and come out when the lights are off.

Plecostomus catfish constantly clean algae off the surfaces of everything. They are very good aquarium fish, but they are not a substitute for cleaning your aquarium and changing some of the water. You need to do regular water exchanges of at least 80% on an every 2 to 3 week routine, depending on the population and size of your tanks. Trust Ol'Lotsoffish and me, Ol'Karen on this. Regular Plecostomus can live 10 years and probably much longer and grow to be at least 24" long, but they rarely exceed 12" in an aquarium. 

Common Bristlenose is known as Ancistrus sp cirrhosus. it is a genus of freshwater fish in the family Loricariidae of order Siluriformes. Fish of this genus are commonly known as the bushynose or bristlenose plecos.

Ancistrus species have the capability of obtaining oxygen through their modified stomach. This allows them to survive in conditions with low oxygen levels.  I found this to be true in Common Pleco too ( the super large ones )

Breeding takes place in hollows, caves and mud holes in banks. Males may clean the inside of the cavity with their suckermouth before allowing the female to approach and inspect the nest. Courtship includes expanding the dorsal and caudal fins and attempts by the male to escort the female to the nest. While the female inspects the nest, the male keeps close contact. The female may lay 20-200 adhesive eggs, usually to the ceiling of the cavity.

The female plays no role in parental care; the male takes care of its young. Males will clean the eggs and the cavity with its fins and mouth. Males inspect eggs to remove diseased or infertile eggs, and aerates the clutch by fanning them with its pectoral and pelvic fins.[3] During this time, a male usually will not leave the cavity to feed, or will leave only occasionally and quickly return.The eggs hatch in 4–10 days over a period of 2–6 hours; the male guards the eggs for 7–10 days after hatching. The fry remain in the cave, attaching to the walls and ceiling with their mouths, absorbing their yolk sac in 2–4 days and becoming free swimming.

Males of these species are competitive and territorial. Males display to each other by positioning themselves parallel to each other, head to tail, with dorsal and caudal fins erect and cheek odontode spines everted. If this escalates to combat, the males will circle each other and direct attacks at the head. If an intruding male manages to evict another male from the nest, it may cannibalize the other male's young.

A male bristlenose may guard several clutches of eggs simultaneously. Females prefer males that are already protecting eggs and may prefer males that are protecting larvae; it has been suggested that the tentacles may act as a fry mimic to attract females, which would allow males without eggs in their nest to compete with males guarding eggs. Several clutches in various states of development from eggs to free-swimming larvae can be found in one ne

There are currently 64 recognized species in this genus:
Albino Bristle-nose catfish, Ancistrus sp.

  Firstly, Bristlenose Catfish are also known as Bristlenose Plecos as well, depending on where in the world you come from. So just for the sake of not making the topic any more confusing than it needs to be I’ll use the term Catfish for this article.

Therefore, as I’ve already stated, the Common Bristlenose is known as Ancistrus sp cirrhosus. Up until recently though this species was incorrectly known as Ancistrus sp dolichopterus, which is in fact a totally different species of Ancistrus. Therefore be careful as you may find some older references that still refer to cirrhosus as dolichopterus.

So what you’ll find is Ancistrus sp cirrhosus is the Bristlenose that’s most commonly found in live fish shops and is sold as algae eaters for large community tanks. Ancistrus sp cirrhosus is usually brown with spots but you can also find Albinos as well. Then to divide the species up even further there are shortfin and longfin varieties each of which come in the normal brown colour and the albino colour as well.

Therefore within the species cirrhosus you’ll commonly find that the different varieties are referred to as;

  Common Bristlenose – brown shortfin
  Albino Bristlenose – albino shortfin
  Common Longfin – brown longfin
  Albino Longfin – albino longfin

Then you can also get a Marble variety, plus other colour varieties as well.

Next up, what do the L numbers refer to?

Well for starters L numbers are given to species that haven’t yet been scientifically classified and as such not yet assigned a specific species name. Some of the L number Bristlenoses are species in their own right while others are variations of existing species and may in fact be sub-species.

What you’ll also find is L numbers are assigned throughout the family Loricariidae which consists of several Genera (plural for Genus) of which the Ancistrus genus is just one. Therefore for the sake of simplicity (as if it already isn’t confusing enough) we’ll only deal with L numbers here that relate to the Genus Ancistrus.

Therefore, find below a table with L numbers for the Genus Ancistrus listed (reference: http://theaquariumwiki.com/List_of_L-Numbers) This should give you a clearer idea of how it works.

What you’ll find is some L numbers are simply known as Ancistrus sp, some have been assigned several L numbers, some have a common name as well and others have been assigned a species name."

http://bristlenosecatfish.com/ancistrus-sp/




​Rubber Nose Pleco

"Due to strict export regulations, the Rubber lipped pleco is virtually non-present in the international aquarium trade. Its scientific name is Chaetostoma sp. aff. milesi . The Rubber nose pleco is also known as Rubbernose pleco and Bulldog pleco. " (yet, I have seen them, yeah right in LFS)

"The Rubber nose pleco can reach a length of 13 cm (5.1 inches). Identifying the members of the genus Chaetostoma can be tricky, but most of the species have so called interopercular odontodes which are spines located behind the gill-cover. They are also without any abdominal plates and only Chaetostoma platyrhynchus have plates on the edge of the snout. Chaetostoma species are sometimes confused with members of the genus Ancistrus, but the Ancistrus catfish is equipped with fleshy tentacles on the snout."
       http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/pleco/rubbernose.php

"What you’ll also find is L numbers are assigned throughout the family Loricariidae which consists of several Genera (plural for Genus) of which the Ancistrus genus is just one. Therefore for the sake of simplicity (as if it already isn’t confusing enough) we’ll only deal with L numbers here that relate to the Genus Ancistrus.

Therefore, find below a table with L numbers for the Genus Ancistrus listed (reference: http://theaquariumwiki.com/List_of_L-Numbers) This should give you a clearer idea of how it works.

What you’ll find is some L numbers are simply known as Ancistrus sp, some have been assigned several L numbers, some have a common name as well and others have been assigned a species name."

http://bristlenosecatfish.com/ancistrus-sp/






    Ancistrus wigglers 4 days old.
Ancistrus at 3 inches are already relatively easy to sex.
 Acanthicus adonis belly Bristlenose
      Acanthicus adonis Bristlenose
                  L204 Bristlenose
          Long Fin Albino Bristlenose
        Bristlenose Business End
              Red Calico Bristlenose

http://lotsoffish.tripod.com/more%20yet%20more%20music/joe_walsh_-_lifes_been_good_to_me_so_far.mp3


HEY Folks, how do you like the nice red background. I decided to have it red because Ancistrus light my fire!
Ancistrus Eggs in a Hollow Log
           Vampire Bristlenose
About 30 years ago my Mother, saw one of these in the LFS.  She had no aquarium but had to have this guy -- so she spent over $375 for a 30 Gallon set up to house this guy.  She fell out of love one day when she was tidying up his quarters and the little stinker attacked her and drew blood.  He went back to the fish store and she ended up with tame guppys.  LOL